Tag Archive | "League Seasons"

Ichiro Reaches Musial Numbers

The New York Yankees’ outfielder, Ichiro Suzuki, reaches an amazing plateau last night.

StanIchiro

With a single to left field, Ichiro had his 4,000th hit of his professional career.  That’s a number that has only been accomplished in Major League Baseball by two individuals, Pete Rose and Ty Cobb.  The problem is, Ichiro did not reach that level in the big leagues.

The 4,000 hits of Ichiro’s professional career span his time in Japan as well as his time in Major League Baseball.  When you combine his 2,722 hits in his MLB career with his 1,278 hits in Japan, Ichiro has reached that mystical 4,000 hit mark.  When you look at it that way, and The Hall Of Very Good did just that here, Ichiro is not the third man to reach that number.  He’s the seventh.

There are some names of importance and some names that beg the question “Who?”, but most importantly to Cardinal fans, there’s a name of historical proportions.

Stan “The Man” Musial had 4,001 hits in his professional career.

That’s a career that started with three minor league seasons as a pitcher before moving to the outfield.  It’s a career that saw an entire season lost while he served his country proudly in World War II.

One of the game’s greatest hitters, and the Cardinals’ greatest ever, achieved 4,001 hits in his career while spending four seasons not hitting.

It is hard to say what Musial would have achieved with those four seasons back.  Even harder to predict what he would have done in today’s environment.  None of this is to say that Ichiro is anything less than a Hall Of Fame outfielder.  Maybe it’s to say just how good he has been.

With his next hit, Ichiro will tie Stan Musial for number of hits in a professional career.

That is the epitome of elite company.

Bill Ivie is the founder of i70baseball.
You can find his work on Yahoo!, InsideSTL, and here on i70.
Talk baseball with him on Twitter @poisonwilliam

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Dyson stealing his way into fans’ hearts

Speed kills and Jarrod Dyson has speed to burn.

JarrodDyson4

 

In the third inning of Tuesday’s game against the Braves, this was on full display. Dyson bunted down the third base line for a single to lead off the inning. He wasted no time stealing second base. He ended up being stranded on third base, but he showed how dangerous his speed can be for opposing teams. Without hitting the ball out of the infield, he had himself in scoring position.

This is what Dyson brings to the table for the Royals. His elite speed gives the team an added weapon that they were missing while Dyson was on the DL (he missed over a month with a high ankle sprain).

The Royals are currently fourth in the majors with 60 steals and Dyson’s return from the DL should only help add to that number. In his first three games back, Dyson had three steals. In 102 games last season, Dyson swiped 30 bases and he stole over 30 bases in four different minor league seasons.

Dyson isn’t the only threat on the bases for the Royals. Alcides Escobar and Elliot Johnson have 11 steals each and Lorenzo Cain has nine. Even first baseman Eric Hosmer has seven steals.

The Royals now have a log jam in the outfield with five players more than capable of manning the position. Alex Gordon should stick in left field. Dyson, Cain, and David Lough can all play center field and Jeff Francoeur is still around to play right field. On Wednesday, Cain played in center with Francouer in right against left-hander Mike Minor. In the previous two games, Dyson played in center with Lough in right, while Cain and Francoeur sat.

With Dyson in the lineup, the Royals are one of the fastest teams in the majors, especially if Dyson, Cain, Escobar and Johnson are all on the field at the same time.

Dyson currently sports a slash line of .292/.320/.604. If he continues to hit and get on base, he should force his way into the lineup, especially against right-handed pitchers.

Because the outfield is so crowded, Dyson may not see everyday at-bats. But even in limited plate appearances, Dyson could threaten the 30 steals mark on the season, which will only help the speedy Royals push the envelope on the base paths.

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Matt Carpenter, Pete Kozma could shatter expectations for St. Louis Cardinals

One of the St. Louis Cardinals’ biggest questions marks during the offseason was how the team would fill the middle infield positions, and the answers the Cardinals found could end up making those positions of strength throughout the season.

102512-matt-carpenter

The Cardinals had planned to have Rafael Furcal be their starting shortstop on opening day, as he had been last season. But Furcal’s torn right elbow ligament didn’t heal in the offseason and he had to undergo surgery during spring training.

That left Pete Kozma, the player who hit .333 in 26 games for the Cardinals last season, as the man to fill one of the most important positions on the field. However, the Cardinals still didn’t have much confidence in Kozma because they still had bad memories of him being the organization’s first-round pick in 2007 that had a .236 batting average in six minor-league seasons.

But shortstop was only one half of the uncertainty surrounding second base for the Cardinals during spring training.

Daniel Descalso played 143 games for the Cardinals in 2012 and played stellar defense whether he was at second base, shortstop or third base, but he also hit just .227. The Cardinals didn’t think they could survive another season with a second baseman who hit under .230 so they asked Matt Carpenter work on learning the position during the offseason so he could potentially take over second base in 2013.

Carpenter did his work and won the job in spring training, but that still meant the Cardinals planned to enter the season with a rookie at shortstop and a former utility player who hadn’t had more than 300 at-bats in a single season.

That combined inexperience justifiably sent shivers down the spines of many Cardinals fans, and for good reason.

The Cardinals had tried to patch holes in the middle infield before with limited success. They traded for Furcal only when Brendan Ryan and Tyler Greene proved they weren’t going to be good enough at shortstop. Also, the Skip Schumaker experiment at second base lasted for a couple of years, but he was replaced by the .227-hitting Descalso last season.

So for better or worse, the Cardinals ended up with Kozma and Carpenter as the middle infield combination for 2013, but early results show this concoction could not only work, but it could work pretty well.

Carpenter hasn’t played second base yet because he’s been over at third base while David Freese recovers from an injury, but he and Kozma have already made an impact one series into the season.

Carpenter had three doubles in the team’s first three games, and he played solid-to-great defense at third base. Kozma hit .308 in the opening series against the Arizona Diamondbacks, including a double and a homerun.

Granted, that is an incredibly small sample size. Both players could eventually be exposed throughout the course of the season and consistently take terrible at-bats. But at this point, each has looked confident at the plate and in the field, and they are both getting results.

If that continues, the Cardinals might win a lot of games because of a middle infield composed of two players who the team didn’t even consider good enough to start until circumstances forced them into the lineup.

Sometimes the unexpected gifts are the best of all.

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Is Donnie Joseph for real, or a spring mirage?

You can’t take too much stock in Spring Training performances. For instance, there’s left-handed reliever Donnie Joseph. In two one-inning relief appearances, Joseph faced and struck out six batters, which is impressive. Of course the batters he faced were AAA level players and five of them were left-handed. But if a pitcher is going to make a good impression in Spring Training, Joseph is doing a good job of it.

John Sleezer/The Kansas City Star

Last July, the Royals got Joseph when they sent veteran reliever Jonathan Broxton to Cincinnati. In four Minor League seasons, Joseph pitched in 193 games over 225.1 innings with a 3.55 ERA and a 3.01 SO/BB ratio, all in relief.

Joseph struggled when he went to AAA Omaha. In 11 games over 17.1 innings, his ERA was 4.15. He struck out 19 batters and gave up 13 walks, ending up with a 1.46 SO/BB ratio.

Despite the two good outings striking out the side, Joseph is a long shot to make the team. His command of the strike zone is inconsistent, and he’s only pitched 29 games in AAA. And there’s the current makeup of the bullpen. The Royals plan to carry seven relievers and for now Greg Holland, Kelvin Herrera, Tim Collins and Aaron Crow are locks. And who doesn’t get the fifth starter job between Bruce Chen, Luke Hochevar and Luis Mendoza will join the bullpen as long relievers. That leaves one spot and 14 pitchers are vying for that spot, including Joseph.

As a lefty, Joseph could be the left-handed specialist if he makes the team. He’s on the on 40-man roster and has options remaining, so even with a great spring, Joseph might end up in Omaha, especially with the strength of the Royals bullpen. If he doesn’t make the Opening Day roster, it wouldn’t hurt Joseph to get more experience facing AAA batters and improving his command. Even if he starts the season in Omaha, it’s likely he’ll be with the Royals sometime this year.

Donnie Joseph isn’t for real yet, but he’s not a mirage either.

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Yuni to rehab in Arkansas

Naturals Roster Moves
Betancourt to begin rehab assignment

SPRINGDALE, AR – The Naturals’ parent club, the Kansas City Royals announced several transactions on Thursday affecting the Northwest Arkansas roster infielder Yuniesky Betancourt will begin his rehab assignment with the Naturals today.  Left-hander Andrew Dobies was reinstated from the seven-day disabled list and released.  Left-handed reliever Jon Keck was transferred from Class-A Advanced Wilmington to Northwest Arkansas.

Betancourt last appeared in a game for the Royals on May 1 against Detroit.  In 15 games this season, Betancourt has posted a .280 batting average with one home run and three RBI.

Yuniesky was resigned by the Royals as a free agent on December 20, 2011.  He has appeared in the major leagues with the Royals, Seattle Mariners, and Milwaukee Brewers in his eight major league seasons.  Betancourt is a career .269 hitter in the major leagues over 977 career games.

Dobies had appeared in two games for the Naturals this season allowing four hits and three runs over five innings of work.  The left-hander was signed as a free agent last season by the Royals.

Keck was promoted to Double-A for the first time after splitting last season between Class-A Kane County and Wilmington.  The Luray, Tennessee native, has gone 2-1 with a 1.61 ERA in 11 appearances for the Blue Rocks.  He has worked 22.1 innings and surrendered 15 hits and 12 walks, while striking out 15.  Keck was originally selected in the 42nd round of the 2009 draft out of Bethel College.

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Royals Sign Kouzmanoff

ROYALS AGREE TO TERMS WITH THIRD BASEMAN Kevin Kouzmanoff ON A MINOR LEAGUE CONTRACT FOR 2012
Contract includes invitation to Major League Spring Training

KANSAS CITY, MO (January 14, 2012 — The Kansas City Royals announced today that the club has agreed to terms with third baseman Kevin Kouzmanoff on a minor league contract for the 2012 season.  The contract includes an invitation to Royals Major League Spring Training camp in Surprise, Ariz<

The 30-year-old Kouzmanoff (KOOZ-mah-nahf) combined to play 73 games for the Oakland Athletics and Colorado Rockies in 2011, batting .235 with seven home runs, 33 RBI and 24 runs scored.  The right-handed hitter is a career .255 batter with 85 home runs and 361 RBI over six Major League seasons with the Indians (2006), Padres (2007-09), A’s (2010-11) and Rockies (2011).

He is a career .279 hitter with a .453 slugging percentage against left-handed pitchers.  The 6-foot-1, 210-pounder is known as a strong defender, leading all N.L. third baseman with a .990 fielding percentage in 2009, and averaged nearly 19 home runs a season from 2007-2010.

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Jirschele Returns to Omaha for 13th Season

Jirschele Returns to Omaha for 13th Season
Gregg, Henry, Iannicca also back to defend Pacific Coast League crown

OMAHA, Neb. — Mike Jirschele, recently presented with Minor League Baseball’s 2011 Mike Coolbaugh award, will return for his 13th season at the helm of the Triple-A affiliate of the Kansas City Royals. The Clintonville, Wisc., native will lead the Storm Chasers in their quest to defend their Pacific Coast League Championship, the team’s first league title since 1990.

Jirschele, 52, has a career managerial record of 1055-999 dating back to 1992, all with the Kansas City organization. That includes a mark of 842-883 in Omaha, with stints from 1995-97 and 2003 through this past season. He is a four-time winner of the Royals’ Dick Howser Award, given for his excellence in 1992, 1994, 2005 and 2011.

Joining the veteran skipper will be hitting coach Tommy Gregg (fourth season in Omaha) and pitching coach Doug Henry (third season in Omaha).

Gregg, a veteran of nine major league seasons, helped blossoming young stars Eric Hosmer, Mike Moustakas, Johnny Giavotella, Manny Pina and Salvador Perez make their big league debuts during the 2011 campaign. His leadership was evident when Jirschele was on personal leave during the middle of the year, as Gregg served as the de facto manager and helped maintain the team’s lead in the American Conference Northern Division standings.

Henry, who pitched 11 seasons in the majors – including one with the Royals – led a pitching staff that survived several big-league call-ups and featured PCL Pitcher of the Year Luis Mendoza, who recorded a sensational 2.18 ERA in 144.1 innings. Henry put together a rotation that led the league in earned run average in the months of April, July and August, with August’s 3.21 ERA pacing the circuit by nearly a full run over Nashville’s 4.10 mark.

Assisting the on-field staff will be returning athletic trainer Dave Iannicca and newcomer Joey Greany, who will serve as the Chasers’ strength and conditioning coach.

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Pitching Coach Duncan Might Be Cardinals’ Biggest Loss Yet

St. Louis Cardinals pitching coach Dave Duncan might be the biggest loss to the team this off season.

Before the “humidor era” in Colorado, any hitter who accomplished anything in the mountains was marked with a mental asterisk. For those not familiar with the humidor, it’s a device the Colorado Rockies use to essentially weigh-down baseballs to keep them from riffling through the thin Rocky Mountain air in record amounts. Prior to the humidor, other teams looking to acquire hitters from the Rockies would have to ask themselves: “How will his power numbers translate when he plays all his home games a little closer to sea level?”

A similar question should have been asked by teams looking to acquire pitchers who’ve worked with Cardinals’ pitch coach, Dave Duncan, who’s walking away from the Cardinals to tend to his wife, who’s battling cancer.

Dave Duncan’s mastery of getting the very best out of his pitchers may never be fully comprehended by anyone who hasn’t worked directly with him. There’s really no logical explanation as to how he could turn around countless careers of pitchers dwelling in the pitfalls of mediocrity.

Andy Benes:
Benes’ ERA rose four-consecutive seasons, peaking at 4.76 before joining the Cardinals in 1996, Duncan’s first season in St. Louis. Benes’ ERA dropped to 3.83 in 1996, and his 18-10 record was good enough for him to finish a career-high 3rd place in the Cy Young voting. The following season, Benes’ ERA dropped to 3.10. After his ERA ballooned back up when he signed with Arizona, Benes returned to St. Louis in 2000 and had a career best 2.78 ERA in 2002.

Todd Stottlemyer:
During Stottlemyer’s last nine major league seasons, his ERA was over 4.00 every season he wasn’t working with Duncan. The 3 season he spent in St. Louis, his ERA was below 4.00.

Kent Bottenfield:
In 9 seasons, Bottenfield had 46 wins, 22 of which came during his 2 seasons in St. Louis. Duncan helped mold him into an All-Star in 1999, when he went 18-7 with a 3.97 ERA. That made Bottenfield valuable enough for the Angels to trade St. Louis perennial All-Star, Jim Edmonds in exchange for Bottenfield, who won just 10 more games in his post-Duncan career.

Jeff Weaver:
Jeff Weaver’s post season numbers prior to pitching with Dave Duncan were as follows:

2002 – 6.75 ERA
2003 – 9.00 ERA
2004 – 11.57 ERA

You can probably tell where this is heading… but in 2006 with Dave Duncan by his side, Weaver had an ERA of 2.42 during the Cardinals’ World Series run.

Kyle Lohse:
Lohse’s lowest ERA in his first 6 seasons in the big leagues was 4.18, and he was coming off a 4.62 ERA season in 2007 before being acquired by St. Louis in 2008. That season, his ERA dropped to 3.78, and in 2011, he posted a career best 3.39 ERA to go with his 14-8 record.

Jason Marquis:
Jason Marquis had ERAs of 5.04 and 5.53 in Atlanta before being demoted to the bullpen during the middle of the 2003 season. The next 2 season in St. Louis, Marquis posted a 3.93 ERA and 28 wins.

Chris Carpenter:
This one just might be the biggest shocker on the list, because baseball fans everywhere think of Carp as a fiery competitor, driven to succeed, and a pitcher who relies mostly on natural abilities to dominate opponents. Well, believe it or not, Carpenter spent six seasons in Toronto as a sub-.500 pitcher whose ERA was never lower than 4.09. That’s right, Carp’s career record was 49-50, and his ERA ballooned above 5.00 at times. Enter Dave Duncan, and Carpenter’s ERA has never been higher than 3.46. He has a record of 95-42 with St. Louis, the team is 15-3 in his playoff starts, he won the Cy Young Award in 2005, and he’s finished multiple seasons with an ERA in below 3.00.

Believe it or not, these names are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Dave Duncan’s resume. He’s coached 4 different pitchers to Cy Young Awards, and has led the Cardinals to the league’s 3rd best ERA over the past 16 seasons. In those seasons, the Cardinals have been to the playoffs 9 times and have two World Series titles.

Tony La Russa and Albert Pujols will be missed, but one could argue that the departure of Dave Duncan is the biggest blow to the team this offseason.

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Lost In Right Field

The sun has finally set on the Chiefs horrendous up and down season. The countdown to the Major League Baseball season can finally begin. Well at least for those of us in Kansas City. Now let’s turn our focus to the Royals. This week baseball fans saw reports from Buster Olney ranking the ten best of everything. Our Kansas City Royas came in number 9 in his outfield rankings. This gave me the idea to compare American League Central teams position by position for the next 10 weeks until Spring Training is upon us. Obviously, if something important happens with the Royals organization, I will be sure to address it. This week, I thought I would begin by examining the right fielders. The following statistics will give us a view of each player’s 2011 season.

Team Player Avg. OBP SLG OPS H 2B 3B HR RBI SB
Chi Dayan Viciedo .255 .327 .314 .641 26 3 0 1 6 1
Cle Shin-Soo Choo .259 .344 .390 .733 81 11 3 8 36 12
Det Brennan Boesch .283 .341 .458 .799 121 25 1 16 54 5
KC Jeff Francoeur .285 .329 .476 .805 171 47 4 20 87 22
Min Josh Willingham .246 .332 .477 .810 120 26 0 29 98 4

The Chicago White Sox have been extremely active this week, including trading perennial All Star right fielder Carlos Quentin. This leaves a relative unknown in right field for the White Sox Dayan Viciedo. Throughout the minor leagues Dayan has been a consistent offensive player. In 3 minor league seasons Dayan hit for an average .284 with 52 total Home Runs and 203 RBI’s. With Viciedo, the Tigers can only wait and see what type of player he will be in the major leagues. It was a big gamble to trade Carlos Quentin, but it could be an advantage for the other AL Central teams.

The Cleveland Indians have been relatively quiet all off season. The Indians have arguably the best and most consistent right fielder in the division. Shin-Soo Choo. 2011 was a down season for Choo. He battled injuries the entire season. If Choo can return to form of the previous 3 seasons where he hit over .300 and averaged 18 HR’s and 80 RBI’s he will be a force to reckon with.

The Detroit Tigers currently list Brennan Boesch as their starting right fielder on their official depth chart. Boesch has played consistently over the past two years. Boesch is still a relatively unkown player. He has produced roughly the same power numbers during his two major league seasons. In 2010 he hit 26 doubles and 14 HR’s with 67 RBI’s in 133 games. You can see above his 2011 numbers have shown growth in OBP and Slg. If Boesch continues to grow as a hitter and improve his batting average the Detroit offense will only be that much better than they already are.

The Kansas City Royals will start Jeff Franceour in right field. After signing Jeff to a 2 year extension during last season, Royals fans can only hope Jeff’s production remains close to what he produced last season. Last season’s production was well beyond expectations in my opinion. Jeff is still a free swinger and does not take a walk as you can see from his OBP. This is a stat that really scares me. If Jeff’s BABIP decreases he could experience a significant decrease in average and OBP.

That brings us to the Minnesota Twins. The Twins acquired Josh Willingham this offseason. Josh will provide the Twins with a significant power bat in the middle of the order. Josh has consistently been a 20+ home run hitter. He will provide protection to Mauer and Morneau. As with a lot of power hitters though, Josh has a tendency to strike out. Josh will not hit for a high average, but will provide that worry to opposing pitchers that he could strike with the long ball.

Now that all right fielders have briefly been discussed, I will rank them from 1 to 5 in my point of view as to how their overall production for the 2012 season will stack up.

  1. Shin-Soo Choo
  2. Jeff Franceour
  3. Brennan Boesch
  4. Josh Willingham
  5. Dayan Viciedo

In my opinion, Shin-Soo Choo will regain his form previous seasons and be a big contributor to the Cleveland offense. I believe Jeff Franceour will take a step backwards, but will still provide the Royals a solid bat in the middle of their lineup. Boesch could have a breakout season and prove me wrong for putting him third. Willingham will provide power but will not consistently hit for average so he ranks fourth. Vicideo, really is an unkown and we will have to see what he can do.

For the Royals sake, lets root for Frenchy to continue to produce close to the level he did last season and provide veteran leadership in the middle of a young lineup.

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Should We Go Loco For Lorenzo

As Royals fans we all know about Dayton’s plan. We hear Dayton wants young athletic players to fill his Major League roster. We hear how spacious Kauffman Stadium’s outfield is. Then in 2011 we sign Melky Cabrera coming off the worst season of his career. Offensively, we knew Melky had tools, but defensively we knew he could be atrocious. He was coming off a season where his UZR/150 rating was -25.2 in Atlanta as a CF. Not the worst of his career, but you see my point. After this signing, came the inevitable trade of Zack Greinke to the Milwaukee Brewers. This is where our Lorenzo Cain story starts.

Lorenzo was the young up and coming CF of the Milwaukee Brewers. Lorenzo had experienced his first taste of the big leagues in 2010, playing in 43 games. We heard about his athleticism and the defensive tools he was bringing. We clamored for Lorenzo to get the opportunity to start in 2011 as our centerfielder. Lorenzo performed well in spring training, but Melky was promised CF. Staying true to his word to Melky, Lorenzo was off to Omaha. In Omaha, Lorenzo proved he was ready for his chance. In 128 games Lorenzo hit .312 with a .380 OBP. Throughout his minor league progression, he has shown an ability to hit for average and get on base. In 7 minor league seasons, Lorenzo has posted a .295 average and a .368 OBP. This year, Lorenzo had a power surge hitting 16 home runs to go along with his 28 doubles and 7 triples. Will this translate into major league production? This will be the big question going into the 2012 season. Bill James seems to think so. His projections for Lorenzo Cain’s 2012 season show splits of .284/10/58. With his past numbers and the development he has continued to show, it seems we can expect solid offensive production from Lorenzo. By no means should we expect him to produce like Melky did in 2011, but who would have ever thought Melky would have produced the way he did.

That brings us to an aspect Lorenzo brings that no “legitimate” Kansas City CF has had. SPEED! Cain currently may not be a prolific base stealer, but has shown flashes that he knows how to use his speed. More importantly, Lorenzo will be able to use his speed and instincts to patrol the spacious outfield at Kauffman Stadium. During times that Lorenzo struggles offensively, which is something we can expect from a young player with a long swing, his defense can save runs. When you compare the UZR/150 ratings it can put a player’s defensive value into runs saved. The most fascinating aspect of this statistic is how much defense can off-set a player’s offensive value. Let’s compare recent Kansas City CF’s defensive statistics.

2011 Melky Cabrera

Season Team

Pos

Inn

Rarm

Rhr

Rpm

Drs

Bis

plays

Rzr

Ooz

Arm

Rngr

errR

UZR

UZR/150

2011 Royals

CF

1265.2

-1

2

-4

-3

276

249

.902

67

-3.0

-6.3

0.7

-8.6

-9.7

2009 – 10 Mitch Maier

Season Team

Pos

Inn

Rarm

Rhr

Rpm

Drs

Bis

plays

Rzr

Ooz

Tzl

Fsr

Arm

Rngr

errR

UZR

UZR/150

2009 Royals

CF

593.0

4

0

-6

-2

162

150

.926

31

-4.0

-4

3.8

-4.5

0.7

0.1

-0.4

2010 Royals

CF

525.2

3

0

-3

0

158

147

.930

26

0.0

-2

3.2

-2.5

0.0

0.6

2.7

2010 Lorenzo Cain

Season Team

Pos

Inn

Rarm

Rhr

Rpm

Drs

Bis

plays

Rzr

Ooz

Tzl

Fsr

Arm

Rngr

errR

UZR

UZR/150

2010 Brewers

CF

306.1

2

0

4

6

79

71

.899

25

2.0

2

-1.0

3.2

-0.7

1.5

5.7

 

As you can see from the sample sizes above Lorenzo Cain profiles to be a much better defensive centerfielder than the players who have patrolled centerfield in Kansas City most recently. Lorenzo’s defensive ability will continue to improve as he grows comfortable with his surroundings at Kauffman Stadium. One of my favorite quotes from Lorenzo regarding his defensive ability was taken from an interview with Rob White of the Omaha World Herald. “I like to run around out there and use my legs a little bit,” he said. “I try to get the best reads I can and make plays for our pitchers. It’s always fun to save some runs when you can.” For our young and developing pitching staff this is vital. We witnessed the difference an outstanding defensive SS can make. Adding the additional defensive element up the middle will strengthen our defense significantly.

That brings us back to our initial question. Should We Go Loco For Lorenzo? Since 2004 when David Dejesus made his full time Major League debut we have not had a center fielder to be excited about. If Lorenzo Cain can provide us with David Dejesus like offensive production, which is close to what his current statistics project to be. With the defensive production Lorenzo Cain provides we may have someone special on our hands. Is it time to go Loco? I say why not! Lorenzo still has a lot to prove, but the talent and desire is there. Lorenzo profiles to be one more piece to the championship puzzle we all crave. Let’s Go Loco For Lorenzo!

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